Tag: appalachia

  • Know Their Past, Know Thyself

    Know Their Past, Know Thyself

    Dear Readers of TWB, This is an essay from the archives, regarding my parents. For the next few days, my mother is going to take over. She lives with us, is ninety years old, and has been writing her life down on paper. This essay is an introduction to her world. I’ve written on the […]

  • The Holy Spirit of My Uncle’s Cojones, Part 3

    The Holy Spirit of My Uncle’s Cojones, Part 3

    In this part of the novel, you get a real taste of what some of us call “internalized racism.” This is when a non-white person starts to believe, on a subconscious level, what the racist world says of him: in young, sixteen-year-old’s Tony case, he’s seen as a mongrel, the mix of a white man […]

  • The Holy Spirit of My Uncle’s Cojones, Part 2

    The Holy Spirit of My Uncle’s Cojones, Part 2

    Tony and his Salvadoran-Appalachian family attend his uncle Jack’s funeral, where the mourners aren’t mourning–either the men are running in just to make sure he’s dead, and the two dozen women are lining up to look at their old lover one more time. Here, we learn why Uncle Jack is so important to Tony–we go […]

  • Audio Book: The Holy Spirit of My Uncle’s Cojones, Part 1

    Audio Book: The Holy Spirit of My Uncle’s Cojones, Part 1

    In the first pages of the novel, we meet Antonio “Tony” McCaugh Villalobos, an Appalachian-Salvadoran writer living in Knoxville, Tennessee, and far from his Salvadoran roots. He’s just published his first book, a literary novel, which means he didn’t get any money for it. He’s trying to write his next novel, but has writer’s block. […]

  • TWB Podcast: What Is Aesthetics? And Why Should a Writer Care?

    TWB Podcast: What Is Aesthetics? And Why Should a Writer Care?

    In class, we talk a lot about aesthetics, or the study of art–both appreciating it and creating it. It’s something the writer (the literary writer) is thinking about all the time, even if she doesn’t know she is. Walk with me into the Smokey Mountains of Tennessee, where I once held a classroom with a […]