Month: February 2018

  • Finding My Latino Roots in a War Zone

    Finding My Latino Roots in a War Zone

    Michelle and I flew into Nicaragua in the fall of 1985, a country that gringos weren’t supposed to visit. Ronald Reagan was at war with the country. The Nicaraguans had run Somoza out of the country, the bloody dictator whom the United States had propped up for decades. The Sandinistas were now in charge. And […]

  • El Testimonio, capítulo 1: El Nacimiento del Pocho

    El Testimonio, capítulo 1: El Nacimiento del Pocho

    ¡El primer podcast en español! (But, like any Salvadoran party, everyone is welcome)  Aquí hablo de la vida del pocho–que significa, una fruta podrida, y un Latino que no sabe nada de su cultura, que no habla español, que está lejos de sus raíces. Pero, este pocho decidió, en su juventud, meterse en la cultura salvadoreña para […]

  • T.C. Boyle and I Talk About Sex and More Sex and More Sex…

    T.C. Boyle and I Talk About Sex and More Sex and More Sex…

    T. C. Boyle is one of our own southern California writers, and is an international figure. You can’t pin him down, can’t pigeonhole him. One novel is about the love between migrant farm workers and gringos who live in gated communities (Tortilla Curtain),  another is about an eco-warrior whose daughter lives in a tree (A Friend […]

  • Coming Up: T.C. Boyle, Sex, and My Love for Mamá’s Shithole Country

    Coming Up: T.C. Boyle, Sex, and My Love for Mamá’s Shithole Country

    This week I have a couple of special podcasts coming up. One is an interview with T.C. Boyle. The other is called El Testimonio. A few years ago I had a radio show on KPFK, 90.7 fm, here in Los Angeles. It’s the local affiliate of Pacifica Radio, and about two miles left of NPR. […]

  • Writing from the Classroom: Silvya Rivas and her Spanish Poetry

    Writing from the Classroom: Silvya Rivas and her Spanish Poetry

    Poemas en español, ¡qué alegre! These are three poems by Silvya Rivas, a student at Mount St. Mary’s University in Los Angeles. You’ll note the Central American tone to them, with “vos” intermixed with “tú” throughout the lines. HOY Hoy, un día regular, mi mente se pierde ¿Qué será del día de mañana? Traerá novedades, nuevas […]